12 Days until EMV deadline. What do you need to do to protect your site?

Gilbarco Veeder-RootEMV
Exclusive EMV Webinar for Gas Station Retailers

The Importance of EMV Compliance

With less than 6 months before the deadline, it is extremely important that you begin to plan for the EMV transition. Join us for a step-by-step guide on how to help your business avoid absorbing fraudulent fees for non compliance.

1. How to protect your site, starting today?
2. What equipment do you need to upgrade?
3. What kind of incentives are available?

Creating a Competitive Advantage with EMV Upgrades
APRIL 07, 2021 | 11:00/10:00 AM EST/CST

OR
APRIL 07, 2021 | 3:00/2:00 PM EST/CST

Learn how to reduce risk, protect your business, and make the best EMV upgrade decisions.

REGISTER NOW!

Looking for Gilbarco equipment? Click on the links below to visit our web store :

Pumps & Dispensers
Passport Point of Sale
Gilbarco Passport Point of Sale
Forecourt Payment Options
Gilbarco Forecourt Payment Options
Forecourt Merchandising
Gilbarco Forecourt Merchandising Options

Click here to search all Gilbarco equipment and parts listed in our web store.

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any of your EMV questions, concerns or to place an order by calling 1.800.451.4021 or visit us online at johnwkennedyco.com for all your petroleum equipment needs.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
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Franklin Fueling Systems EVO™ 600 and EVO™ 6000 ATGs FREE ONLINE TRAINING!!

GET CERTIFIED ON THE LATEST ​​​AUTOMATIC TANK GAUGE TECHNOLOGY

For a limited time, we are offering FREE FFS PRO® University online certification for EVO™ 600 and EVO™ 6000 Automatic Tank Gauge Installation / Wiring and Programming.

This free online training is available now through June 30, 2021!!

Franklin Fueling Systems Fueling System Safety A few things to know before you get started on the free training. 

You are required to have an FFSPRO account. If you do not have one, you can register here.

Next, you will be required to take the online Fueling System Safety course. Be aware that if you are not using one of the following browsers, you may encounter functionality and content issues:
Internet Explorer 9 or later
Safari 5.1 or later
Google Chrome 17 or later

Controller Specialist: EVO™ 600 & EVO™ 6000 Installation & Wiring

Controller Specialist: EVO™ 600 & EVO™ 6000 Installation & Wiring EVO™ 600 and EVO™ 6000 automatic tank gauge model overview, installation and wiring of modules, probes, remote alarms, sensors, and Turbine Pump Interface

Begin Presentation          (Login to Take Test!)

PREREQUISITES:
Fueling System Safety

Site Startup Specialist: EVO™ 600 & EVO™ 6000 Programming

Site Startup Specialist: EVO™ 600 & EVO™ 6000 Programming EVO™ 600 and EVO™ 6000 fuel management & system programming including user/network interfacing, console navigation, initial setup, and optional supported feature programming.

Begin Presentation       (Login to Take Test!)

PREREQUISITES:
Fueling System Safety

EVO™ 600 & EVO EVO™ 6000

The new EVO™ 600 and EVO™ 6000 ATGs provide highly accurate inventory management and full-featured compliance monitoring for any size fuel system. Advanced features include Corrosion Control™ System automation and monitoring, Electronic Line Leak Detection, and DEF/AdBlue® recirculation.

Be sure to check out our ever-expanding product offerings and great deals from Franklin Fueling’s many brands found in our webstore.

EVO 600 Base Model
EVO 600 Base Model
EVO 6000 Base Model
EVO 6000 Base Model
FFS APT FFS CableTight FFS EBW
FFS EVO FFS FE Petro FFS Flex-Ing
FFS Healy FFS Incon FFS UPP

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!

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OPW DSE: The No Brainer Secondary Container

OPW DSE Advanced Composite Technology Dispenser Sump

DSE Dispenser Sump

Most dispenser sumps force fueling station operators to choose between quality, speed or value. Produced using an Advanced Composite Technology manufacturing process, the DSE Dispenser Sump can deliver all three: best-in-class quality, fast lead times and affordability without sacrifice. The DSE is installed beneath fuel dispensers to provide access to secondary containment of dispenser plumbing, emergency shear valves and underground piping connections.

Features & Benefits:

Advanced Composite Technology –The only product in the industry made by a premium, close-molded manufacturing process

Quick and Efficient Manufacturing Time per Unit – Allows OPW to offer the shortest dispenser sump lead times in the industry

Smooth Surface on Both Sides of the Sump Wall – Consistent wall thickness, material blend, shape and detail for a perfect product every time and strong bonds with fittings

One Base for All Dispenser Models –Minimizes distributor inventory and provides the convenience of choosing the style needed

Compatible with all fittings and pipe – Seamlessly works with fiberglass pipe, flexible pipe, and any industry fittings

Backed by OPW – Legendary OPW quality, service, support and value

Ordering Specifications – DSE Dispenser Sumps

Sump Dimensions Weight
Model # A
in. | cm
B
in. | cm
C
in. | cm
D
in. | cm
with Top
lbs | kg
DSE-1836 20.22 | 51.36 17.20 | 43.69 44.11 | 112.04 35.90 | 91.19 85 | 38.56
DSE-1543 17.18 | 43.64 14.60 | 37.084 45.90 | 116.59 38.90 | 98.81 85 | 38.56
DSE-1741 18.50 | 46.99 16.70 | 42.42 44.20 | 112.29 38.10 | 96.774 83 | 37.65

Sump Component Part Numbers

Part # Description
215192 Universal Base. Combine with 215567, 215568 or 215569 to make a complete DSE sump
215567 Gilbarco Encore Top. Combine with 215192 to make DSE-1836
215568 Wayne Ovation Top. Combine with 215192 to make DSE-1543
215569 Wayne Helix Top. Combine with 215192 to make DSE-1741

The DSE can be ordered as a complete sump (one top and universal base), or the tops and universal base can be ordered as individual components

Stabilizer Bar Part Numbers

Part # Description
SBK-1800 Stabilizer bar kit for Gilbarco Encore
SBK-1500 Stabilizer bar kit for Wayne Ovation
SBK-1700 Stabilizer bar kit for Wayne Helix
DSE Dispenser Sump Brochure
OPW DSE
Dispenser Sump
Product Brochure
DSE Dispenser Sump Brochure
OPW DSE
Dispenser Sump
Data Sheet
DSE Dispenser Sump Brochure
OPW DSE
Dispenser Sump
Video

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
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Combat Corrosion: Is Water Hiding in Your Fueling System?

Is Water Hiding in Your Fueling System?

Is Water Hiding in Your Fuel?

Veeder-Root

Operators of gas stations have a lot on their minds, and the water within their fueling system may seem like a low priority, but there are many reasons to consider water as a serious threat that needs to be removed.

The primary issue is that water, fuel and bacteria, are the three common components that combine to create a corrosive environment around fueling systems. In sump spaces water is often combined with ethanol vapors as the catalyst for microbial growth, but in-tank corrosion is more likely to happen with ultra-low sulfur diesels or biodiesels.

Hidden Below the Surface

Of the three common components, water is the easiest to address but first you need know where it’s hiding.

Many underground storage tanks have magnetostrictive probes with separate water detection floats (1), but they require a minimum water level of ¾” in the probe area to go into alarm. This is great for identifying a catastrophic breech of the tanks integrity but less effective for identifying water that as slowly accumulated below that threshold over time.

Depending on the tilt of your tank there could be stagnate water at the lowest point of your tank (2) that could be a breeding ground for bacteria.
Is Water Hiding

Identifying Water is Key

When microbial growth feeds on components of the fuel, biomass then settles in the water at the bottom of the tank and creates the acidic environment that leads to corrosion. The key to avoiding tank corrosion is identifying the water in the tank and removing it. Once water is removed, one of the common components of the equation is gone and the environment is no longer corrosive.

Learn more about fuel system corrosion, indicators of it, and its impact.

hydrx install

Register for the HydrX Fuel Conditioning System Webinar

This webinar will discuss how the Veeder-Root HydrX Fuel Conditioning System combats in-tank corrosion by eliminating one of the key drivers of microbial growth.

REGISTER NOW!

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

Behind the scenes of filling up: How do operators keep track of their fuel inventory?

This is Veeder-Root’s fifth article in their series on what actually happens when you fill up at a gas station. Read the others here:
Behind the Scenes of Filling Up:
1. How Does it Work?
2. Gaining Approval and Getting Started
3. How does the fuel actually get to the nozzle?
4. How do gas stations ensure fuel isn’t leaking?
.

Keeping track of all that fuel

Veeder-Root

When you fill up at a gas station, it’s likely that you’re one of many people getting gas at the same time.

At busy gas stations and c-stores there are multiple transactions happening at one time. In fact, the average c-store dispenses just over 4,000 gallons of fuel per day!

With all that fuel pumping out of the storage tank, how does the site operator maintain an understanding of the current inventory, how much has been sold that day, and the amount of inventory that they started with? This basic information is what they will need for inventory reconciliation, which is the process of making sure that they can account for all the fuel that has been dispensed.

If there is a difference between the amount of fuel that records say are in the storage tank and the actual amount of fuel in the tank, then there is a fuel variance. There are two likely scenarios for the loss, either there is an adjusted loss or an actual physical loss of the fuel.

Adjusted losses accrue when key records of fuel transfer don’t match up. It’s common when the bills of lading, delivery confirmations, automatic tank gauges, and point-of-sale equipment may all supply a different record of the transaction. Contributing to the issue are tank charting and equipment errors, which can mask any actual fuel losses.

Physical loss might happen if there was a leak that went undetected, a meter drift, theft or delivery discrepancy, or even a change in temperature that causes fuel contraction or expansion in the tank.

What Can We Do About it?

The first step is to confirm that the equipment at your gas station is maintained and operating correctly. You then want to ensure that you have accurate tank charts for your site. The next step is to implement a daily reconciliation and variance tracking method.  

C-Store owners should also take advantage of remote connectivity options that allow them to check on their inventory and site status from anywhere. 

Automating The Process

The most accurate way to generate a tank chart is to use AccuChart on your Veeder-Root TLS Automatic Tank Gauge. This application takes frequent measurements and reports back when there is a statistically significant data set for creating an accurate tank chart. 

Once you have an accurate tank chart, an application like Business Inventory Reconciliation (BIR) can automatically calculate fuel variance.

BIR tracks all the fuel that enters or exits each of your underground tanks, accounting for all delivery and dispensing activity. It automatically collects metered sales information from electronic and mechanical dispensers and generates accurate delivery and reconciliation reports.  

This is our final installment in our blog series on what actually happens when you fill up at a gas station. You can find more information on every step of the process here

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

Behind the scenes of filling up: How do gas stations ensure fuel isn’t leaking?

This is Veeder-Root’s fourth article in their series on what actually happens when you fill up at a gas station. Read the others here:
Behind the Scenes of Filling Up:
1. How Does it Work?
2. Gaining Approval and Getting Started
3. How does the fuel actually get to the nozzle?
.

Veeder-Root

With so much fuel passing through a gas station’s fueling system, how do they ensure that fuel isn’t leaking?

For decades now, the Environmental Protection Agency has enforced regulations that require gas stations to prove they aren’t leaking fuel into the ground or the water supply, and there are a number of ways the gas station can meet the requirements. 

But beyond the regulations, fuel costs money – it’s the single most expensive inventory item for gas stations – and leaks or other fuel losses are costly! 

Managing Compliance

Once you’re done filling up, there is an entire monitoring system at the gas station that tests the fuel lines for any potential leaks and monitors important spaces around the site to ensure they’re dry. This system is called an automatic tank gauging system which includes a console, like the TLS-450PLUS ATG, series of sensors throughout the gas station, and probes in the underground fuel tanks. 

The automatic tank gauge system has many functions at a gas station, but at its core it provides the owner and store operator with reports that prove the site isn’t leaking fuel and provides the fuel inventory data needed to run the station. These reports are provided to EPA inspectors to ensure gas stations are complying with the regulations.

Fixing Issues Immediately

It’s important to have the appropriate reports, but leaks must be addressed in real time, and that is where the ATG console is also working like a security system for the fuel site.  

When an issue is detected in the fueling system, the TLS-450PLUS ATG records a condition result and generates an audible and visual alarm for the store operator. Employees at the site can then follow their protocol for addressing the issue.  

The guiding principle is ensuring that the gas station is safe for customers and meeting regulations. 

What’s Next?

Next week, we’re discussing how the TLS-450PLUS ATG gives C-Store owners and operators the business data they need to correctly manage their inventory. 

You can find more information on every step of the process here

 

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

Behind the scenes of filling up: How does the fuel actually get to the nozzle?

This is Veeder-Root’s third article in their series on what actually happens when you fill up at a gas station. Read the first article here. and the second article here.
Veeder-Root

Imagine you’re at a gas station and you’ve started a transaction at a dispenser. Maybe you’ve never given it another thought, but how does the fuel actually get to the nozzle?

The answer is that fuel is pumped up from an underground storage tank via a submersible turbine pump and through the fuel lines to your dispenser nozzle.

The submersible turbine pump is the powerful unsung hero of the fueling system. These pumps have two main components; a packer manifold which is in the sump space and a Unitized Motor Pump (UMP) that sits down in the tank.

Starting the Flow

  1. During a transaction, the packer manifold receives the signal and activates the UMP.Fuel Drawn Into Pump
  2. The UMP starts spinning and that rotational energy creates pressure and moves fuel up through the pump.Fuel Flows into UMP
  3. The fuel flows up through the column pipe to the packer manifold.Fuel Flows up the Column
  4. Fuel enters the packer manifold and goes through a check valve, which is used to keep pressure in the lines, before being discharged into to the fuel lines. Fuel enters packer manifold

Keeping Track

While it’s dispensing fuel to your vehicle, the dispenser is keeping track of exactly what you’ve pumped and how much that costs. Once you’re done, there are a series of signals that are managed through the automatic tank gauge and control boxes that turn off the STP and finish the transaction.  

If using a TLS-450PLUS Automatic Tank Gauge paired with Electronic PLLD, then station operators can also monitor line pressure during the dispense to ensure that system isn’t leaking and meets release detection requirements.

What’s Next?

Next week, we’re discussing how the TLS-450PLUS ATG makes sure the fueling system is free from leaks and compliant with regulatory requirements.

You can find more information on every step of the process here.

 

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

Behind The Scenes Of Filling Up: Gaining Approval and Getting Started

This is Veeder-Root’s second article in their series on what actually happens when you fill up at a gas station. Read the first article here.
Veeder-Root

Most people don’t know this, but a gas station’s fuel dispenser is connected to three primary pieces of equipment that help it run a fueling transaction:

  1. Point-of-Sale System
  2. Red Jacket® ISOTROL™ 1-8 Control Box
  3. TLS-450PLUS Automatic Tank Gauge

These three pieces of equipment make up the system that manage the transaction, calculate inventory data, and facilitate the pumping of the fuel.

The Gate Keeper

When you lift the handle and start a transaction at the dispenser, nothing happens without the Point-of-Sale System approving it. This is because a POS system must authorize a sale to allow next steps to happen.  

The authorization can be done manually by an attendant at the gas station or it can be set to pre-authorization.  

Manual authorization means that someone on site must approve all transactions prior to any dispensing. If you’ve ever been at a site where an attendant must pump all gas, this is likely an instance where they’re using the manual settings. 

In instances of pre-authorization, the POS system allows a transaction to happen once the payment, usually credit or prepaid fuel card, is approved. If you have ever gone to a 24-hour site that is unattended, this is set to pre-approval. 

In either case, the Point-of-Sale System is providing a gate keeper function in the fueling transaction to make sure that only approved fuel dispenses happen. 

Sending the Signal

Now that we know the transaction is authorized, the dispenser will reset the displays and get ready to dispense fuel.  

In order to create the pressure needed in the fuel lines to dispense it, the Red Jacket® Submersible Turbine Pump will need to be activated.  

This is done when the dispenser signals the other key equipment in the process, the ISOTROL 1-8 Control Box, which notifies the TLS-450PLUS ATG. At that point the ATG sends a relay signal to the Red Jacket IQ Smart Control to start the Red Jacket STP and create pressure in the fueling lines.

Now What? 

Next week, we’re discussing how the fuel is pumped from the tank and to the dispenser, including the different modes available. 

You can find more information on every step of the process here

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

How Does it Work? Behind the Scenes of Filling Up

Veeder-Root

For most people, getting gas for their vehicle is an unavoidable, routine part of life. We do it because we have to do it.  

And while we all know how to operate a gas pump, most don’t realize that there’s a symphony of sensors and probes working together to keep the fuel flowing safely and efficiently. 

Today, we’re tackling the first piece of the fueling process, activating the dispenser.

Car Fill Up

Gas Pump vs. Fuel Dispenser 

Yes, there is a big difference between gas pumps and fuel dispensers, even though people use the words interchangeably. 

Some countries use gas pumps, which use a pumping device inside the unit to create suction. The pump pulls fuel out of the storage tank and dispenses it through the product lines and nozzles. 

In North America, we use fuel dispensers. These units work on a pressurized system using a submersible turbine pump immersed in the underground storage tanks to deliver fuel to the dispenser. 

Activating the Dispenser 

So what really happens? The customer pulls up to the dispenser, starts a transaction using a Point-of-Sale system like Passport®, removes the nozzle, and selects a grade.  

A signal is sent to the Red Jacket® ISOTROL™ 1-8 Control Box. The control box isolates signals from the dispensers, and protects against wiring shorts and phasing issues.  

The ISOTROL notifies the TLS-450PLUS Automatic Tank Gauge to activate the  Red Jacket® IQ Smart Control Box and submersible turbine pump

Now What? 

Next week, we’re breaking down the authorization process and how Veeder-Root’s integrated site solutions work together to provide a safe and seamless consumer experience at the gas station. 

You can find more information on every step of the process here.

If you have any questions or would like to purchase Veeder-Root and Red Jacket Products, visit us online at www.johnwkennedyco.com or call us at 1.800.451.4021.

 
 

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo

EMV – What Happens When A Station Isn’t Updated

Gilbarco Veeder-RootEMVExclusive EMV Webinar for Gas Station Retailers

Creating a Competitive Advantage with EMV Upgrades

JANUARY 13, 2021 | 11:00 AM EST
(10:00 AM CST, 9:00 AM MST, 8:00 AM PST)

OR
JANUARY 13, 2020 | 3:00 PM EST
(2:00 PM CST, 1:00 PM MST, 12:00 PM PST)

Learn how to reduce risk, protect your business, and make the best EMV upgrade decisions.

The Importance of EMV Compliance

With less than 6 months before the deadline, it is extremely important that you begin to plan for the EMV transition. Join us for a step-by-step guide on how to help your business avoid absorbing fraudulent fees for non compliance.

1. How to protect your site, starting today?
2. What equipment do you need to upgrade?
3. What kind of incentives are available?

Session 1
REGISTER NOW

Session 2
REGISTER NOW

 

Looking for Gilbarco equipment? Click on the links below to visit our web store :

Pumps & Dispensers
Passport Point of Sale
Gilbarco Passport Point of Sale
Forecourt Payment Options
Gilbarco Forecourt Payment Options
Forecourt Merchandising
Gilbarco Forecourt Merchandising Options

Click here to search all Gilbarco equipment and parts listed in our web store.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any of your EMV questions, concerns or to place an order by calling 1.800.451.4021 or visit us online at johnwkennedyco.com for all your petroleum equipment needs.

The John W. Kennedy Company appreciates your business and continued support!
JWK USA Logo